Relapses

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is nearly always described as a relapsing remitting condition. Essentially, this means symptoms like loss of vision, numbness or weakness of a limb occur for a period of time and then improve, either partially or completely.

For nearly all people with MS, this is the way their MS begins, except for a very small group of people who have primary progressive MS. By nature, MS is variable and unpredictable. People with MS face the uncertainty of not knowing when relapses will occur.

 

Understanding Relapse in Multiple Sclerosis - A guide for people with MS and their families

In January 2015 Novartis Ireland, in consultation with people with MS and MS Ireland, launched a new booklet gives detailed advice on how to manage a relapse and what to expect once one occurs. The guide encourages people to contact their MS nurse or specialist as soon as they experience a relapse.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is nearly always described as a relapsing remitting condition. Essentially, this means symptoms like loss of vision, numbness or weakness of a limb occur for a period of time and then improve, either partially or completely.

For nearly all people with MS, this is the way their MS begins, except for a very small group of people who have primary progressive MS. By nature, MS is variable and unpredictable. People with MS face the uncertainty of not knowing when relapses will occur.

Relapse infographic

In December 2016, MS Ireland and Novartis developed an infographic explaining MS relapses. The infographic was developed in consultation with a group of people with MS and healthcare professionals. 

Steroid Treatment

The most common form of treatment for a relapse is steroid treatment. The role of the multi-disciplinary team in managing MS relapses is also very important. Disease modifying drugs reduce the frequency of relapses and also form part of the management of MS.

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